Sent to kur-world.com for correction 9 October 2016

CC: Mareeba Shire Council

The homepage of the KUR-World website is inaccurate.  In reference to the Kuranda Tree Frog Litoria myola the marketing copy says:

(click images to enlarge)

first para:

Did you know that areas of the KUR-World site could be home to the Myola Tree Frog, an endangered species endemic only to the Kuranda region?

and the last para:

Reever & Ocean is committed to the responsible management of the site’s ecology, including the endangered Myola Tree Frog.

These slides show a composite of Dr Conrad Hoskin’s FEB 2016 report and Google Earth images.

Dr Conrad Hoskin’s report was commissioned by Reever and Ocean Pty Ltd and included in the ‘EPBC Referral of proposed action’ and ‘Initial Advice Statement’ documents regarding the ‘records green‘ and ‘potential yellow‘ of this species.

Records‘ indicate actual frogs heard and reported by a specialist frog scientist from James Cook University – Dr Conrad Hoskin.  There is no ambiguity about the presence of this species on Barnwell / KUR-World – or its exact location on the property.

Please amend this sentence to read: “Did you know that the northern area of the KUR-World site is home to the Myola Tree Frog, a critically endangered species endemic only to the Kuranda region?”

This slide shows a map from Conrad Hoskin’s FEB 2016 report – including protected riparian buffer zones recommended for frog breeding habitat – 100m each side of creeks – indicated in white overlay.

This map is a close-up of the map above and notes the extensive damage done through the building of the dam – highlighted in red.

This slide shows the ‘seasonal gully’ or ‘ephemeral frog breeding habitat’ intact – as it was at the time of purchase – prior to the unpermitted damming / damning.

This slide shows the damage to the creek behind the dam wall.  The initial sediment load was dumped ‘hundreds of metres downstream of the dam’ in December 2015 in a minor rain event.

The photos below were taken in July 2016 after a minor rain event.  Each time it rains now – the clay slurry sediment load is stirred and moved downstream polluting the frog habitat further – and closer to the Barron River.

Please remove this para from the homepage:

“Reever & Ocean is committed to the responsible management of the site’s ecology, including the endangered Myola Tree Frog.”

This has been demonstrated to be completely untrue with Ken Lee’s track record so far.

Slides from this source document:
barnwell-kur-world-kur-cow-land-preparation-to-kur-world-master-plan-ahead-of-any-approvals-august-2016

Please also see:
KUR-MYTH: KUR-World ‘northern area’ is not Critically Endangered Kuranda Tree Frog Habitat

ORIGINAL REQUEST

From: cathy retter <Kuranda Envirocare>
Date: Wed, Sep 14, 2016 at 2:01 PM
Subject: KUR-World website – small correction for Myola tree frog
To: Melanie Wicks <KUR-World>
Cc: Conrad Hoskin <James Cook University>
Hi Melaine,

I’ve been discussing the KUR-World website text regarding the Myola tree frog  with Dr Conrad Hoskin.  It’s great to see it mentioned and the commitment to the ecology that’s been stated there. There are a couple of sentences where we wondered about rewording for clarity.  I’ve marked these in Bold.

I thought we would let you know that we have agreed with Craig Crawford that he will attend a public meeting in early November around the time of the Terms of reference being released.

We’ll let you know the date and whether Craig would like to have someone representing KUR-World present.

kind regards

Cathy Retter
Kuranda Envirocare

 

Website text drop down relating to the Myola tree frog:

Did you know that areas of the KUR-World site are home to the Myola Tree Frog, an endangered species endemic only to the Kuranda region?

The Myola Tree Frog is found in rainforest near slow-moving, permanent and seasonal creeks. The current extent of occurrence for the Myola Tree Frog is estimated to be 13.5km2. The species appears to require reasonably
thick riparian forest with males found near creeks, while the females generally inhabit the rainforest canopy, away from the streams.

Reever & Ocean is committed to the responsible management of the site’s ecology, including the endangered Myola Tree Frog.